Gertie’s World, Charm Patterns Patreon Exclusive Scout Capelet

I was a little dubious when I first saw there was a ‘club scout’ theme for Gertie’s Patreon this year – there isn’t much about ‘scout style’ that would belong in my wardrobe. However, after seeing the capelet and divorcing it from the scout aesthetic, I appreciated the vintage design features. I knew that I could take this year of themed Patreon patterns and turn them on their head. So, instead of the outdoors-inspired uniformed Scout garments, I’ve decided to go down the route of evening wear. I’ve chosen to go with a black and gold colour scheme, creating a mini capsule wardrobe from whatever patterns are released on Gertie’s Patreon this year.

I sourced some deadstock fabric (a brocade) that was used on the set of Bridgerton in the Duke’s wardrobe for this make and I love the end result (gratutitous image alert).

I am just waiting on a delivery of snap fasteners to put the finishing touches to the make – I wasn’t going to run that classic black and gold look by sewing on a glaringly silver popper. I’ll might add a self covered faux button but I’m tempted not to bother as the collar already features some piping detail and I don’t want to drown that clean cut effect by adding a button.

Like many of Gertie’s patterns, the capelet is designed to be used interchangeably with the Hooded Princess Coat Expansion from February 2020’s Patreon content so you could make a hooded capelet. You could even go full out and make a Princess coat with a removable capelet. Gertie offers so many options in her pattern library.

The sizing is, as ever, incredible. While it is not a fitted garment, the bodice pieces are cut in two sizes: A-DD and F-H; use your high bust measurement and find the cup size by running down the size chart.

The capelet comes together so easily – the main body of the capelet is made up of three pieces; the front, back and the flutter sleeve that is cut on the bias so it is really fluid. I love the sleeve movement; it’s very classic Hollywood. There are two collar pieces and two facing pieces (and two little shih tzus overseeing my work).

There are an additional two lining pieces for the front and back capelet lining – you use the same sleeve pieces for both. I used a gold / champagne lining fabric for mine.

Piping on the epaulets and collar is optional (as are the epaulets themselves). Because I was opting for the couture over campfire style of capelet I omitted the epaulets but I decided to pipe the collar with this lovely gold Rico piping ribbon. It was my first time piping anything but I can see myself wanting it on everything as it is such a beautiful little detail. The collar itself wasn’t difficult to adhere to the piping ribbon to as it isn’t a sharp edge collar, thankfully.

Lining and facing the capelet once the collar is constructed and basted on the main body isn’t difficult; the pattern uses a method called bagging which basically involves sewing around the entire garment, leaving a few inches to turn it out – this opening is then hand stitched closed.

This is a really satisfying and versatile make and I am sure I will make more of these in the future. In the meantime, I’ll be concentrating on making a couple of dresses to complement this one.

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